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Not well thought-out



I WONDER what prompted Charles Tannock, foreign affairs coordinator for the European Conservatives and reformists to the European Parliament, to write the article ‘Bangladesh at a crossroads’, which was published in the Daily Star on February 9.
There are quite a number of points that are questionable. At one place, he wrote: ‘Roughly 300 people — many of them members of religious minorities, who are often scapegoated for supporting the Awami League and the ICT — died last year as a result of the protests.’ There are many versions of the killings so one should be 100 per cent sure before commenting on it. It is questionable as no proper investigation was carried out
Then about the caretaker government system, maybe Mr Tannock is unaware of the fact that it was the brainchild of Jamaat-e-Islami. The Awami League and Jamaat jointly staged violent agitation to achieve the caretaker government system and three general elections were held under it.
In 2011, when the Awami League-led government felt that, if the next general election was held under a caretaker government, it could lose because of its mismanagement and misrule, in one stroke, it abolished the system and thrust the country into a great peril.
Mr Tannock wrote, ‘The BNP claimed that there could be no fair elections without a caretaker government, even though they had recently won local municipal elections.’ Oh no! How could these elections be compared to the general election?
He doggedly went on saying that, ‘The government had no choice but to hold the election as mandated by the constitution.’ Is it really so? The constitution is for the people; it has been changed many times before, it could have been changed again to give the people their basic rights. We are feeling betrayed and let down, for not being able to cast our votes.
Nur Jahan
Chittagong




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Not well thought-out

I WONDER what prompted Charles Tannock, foreign affairs coordinator for the European Conservatives and reformists to the European Parliament, to write the article ‘Bangladesh at a crossroads’, which was published in the Daily Star... Full story
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