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Who cares about democracy?



THE absence of democracy is suffocating and oppressive while the struggle to attain it is painful and dangerous. Yet, in Bangladesh, once democracy is obtained, it’s confusing, chaotic and even treacherous. People seem to be confounded in having alternatives, and bewildered at the ability to make choices in an unconstrained manner.
When oppressed people have the easy option of blaming the oppressors for everything they find wrong in their lives there is a bonding mood in society. The enemy is clearly identified and the rules are straightforward, as there are only two groups: those who have power and those who don’t.
Another regrettable feature of our democracy is the politicisation of the civil services and various appointments at every level throughout the country including the academic arena. Whoever comes to power, by and large, tends to appoint individuals who are known to them or support them.
The culture of hartal and strikes are frustrating the public and ruining the image of our country abroad. Violence and uncertainty will seriously hamper the progress. This will contribute to economic disparity and may serve as a source of radicalisation in the future.
Every day strike is said to cost a loss of Tk 250 crore only in the garments sector and recent statistics shows a loss of Tk 4,500 crore in the past few days. Boycotting of parliament and polls are the other problems of the same genre. This devastates the prospect of democracy in the country.
The political leaders of our country are shouting about democracy but are they doing what they are saying? Our politicians seem to be the preserver and beneficiary of democracy but the lives of general people are the price of that benefit. If is not so how can a human be scalded?
Shahin Ahmed
Dhaka University




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Who cares about democracy?

THE absence of democracy is suffocating and oppressive while the struggle to attain it is painful and dangerous. Yet, in Bangladesh, once democracy is obtained, itâs confusing, chaotic and even treacherous. People seem to be... Full story
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